Late September Dogs Record Release

For Late September Dogs, the long wait to record release is finally over!

Late September Dogs Album Release Party
The Vault Speakeasy in Seattle WA, 29 February 2020. Photo by Kurt Clark / Nehi Stripes Seattle / NehiStripes.com

On Saturday, February 29th, the band gathered with 100+ fans and friends, at The Vault Speakeasy inside Do The Extraordinary in downtown Seattle.  The purpose was to celebrate “Learning To Fall” – their long term project that started five years ago. Guitarist Dan Teisan imagined hard rock riffs, sweeping orchestras, a unique groove, and sweet powerful vocals by his sister Liz.  Along with Jackie Farrar – also on vocals – Lui Williams on drums, Jeff Eason on bass, and Jay Smith on guitars, the band succeeded in creating a powerful product.

The night started around 8:00pm with socializing and informal dinner.

Late September Dogs Album Release Party
The Vault Speakeasy in Seattle WA, 29 February 2020. Photo by Kurt Clark / Nehi Stripes Seattle / NehiStripes.com

While guests talked and nibbled, a string trio played music from the record in the background.  Bradley Hawkins on Cello, who arranged the orchestra for the album, was accompanied by Annie Center on violin and Jenn Shoval on viola.

Late September Dogs Album Release Party
The Vault Speakeasy in Seattle WA, 29 February 2020. Photo by Kurt Clark / Nehi Stripes Seattle / NehiStripes.com

There was merch available at the event, including CDs, LPs, stickers and such.

In the back of the venue, there were listening stations – in vinyl and one CD – to hear the record at leisure through headphones!

Late September Dogs Album Release Party
The Vault Speakeasy in Seattle WA, 29 February 2020. Photo by Kurt Clark / Nehi Stripes Seattle / NehiStripes.com

I chose to enjoy the LP version because I had already purchased my own copy.  The album was mixed by Grammy-winning producer Chris Lord-Alge.  I noticed immediately the album had an audio depth that made it feel complete and vibrant.  The lows were heavy, the strings were tight and sweeping, and the vocals had just enough effect to reflect power and innocence at the same time.  In my past discussions with Dan about this project, I’ve come to learn those elements were probably rattling about in this brain for years!

And now those elements have been set free to the world, and are entertaining the rest of us.

Late September Dogs Album Release Party
The Vault Speakeasy in Seattle WA, 29 February 2020. Photo by Kurt Clark / Nehi Stripes Seattle / NehiStripes.com

At about 9:30pm the band ascended the stage to play a recording of the album in its entirety, then discuss the background in between each track!

The crowd got the rundown – about influences, struggles, logistics, new developments, and what it takes to complete a long term project that means so much to them.  For example, the band covered “Ain’t No Rest For The Wicked,” by Cage The Elephant; one friend asked about the protocol and costs related to covering someone’s song.  Dan explained to the crowd that they first had to estimate how many of the album they would sell, and that would determine the cost of the song.  If they wanted to print lyrics on the album jacket, that would have been an extra cost (they chose not to).

“Oh, and for you bands that are planning to do vinyl?” Dan continued, “Don’t do vinyl.”

Turns out the band had to present the appropriate paperwork to the disc makers, to prove they had the right to press all the songs in wax!  They had it all because they had a lot of help.  But still, an extra layer of complication made their project stretch out longer than expected.  I would urge bands to reconsider Dan’s advice of not doing vinyl because in my ears their music is fantastic in this classic tactile medium!

Late September Dogs Album Release Party
The Vault Speakeasy in Seattle WA, 29 February 2020. Photo by Kurt Clark / Nehi Stripes Seattle / NehiStripes.com

All the amazing stories and insider info gave guests a true understanding of what it takes to see something through.  But mostly, the band spent time expressing their thankfulness to each of us – for their families, for our support, for our purchases, and for our friendship.  The artist/fan relationship benefits both ways; each side is enriched by the other.  It is really something special to imagine, develop, create, and share art in all its forms.  Music touches everyone differently. But this night proved that friends and fans were unified in support of LSD’s art and love for the Seattle music scene.

Hearing that in the album made this long term project well worth the wait 🙂

2 Comments

  1. Jeff, I certainly didn’t write the article, but instead of leaving a snarky comment, why not just message Kurt.
    I can guarantee that it wasn’t intentional. By the way, we donate our time too, so it’s not like we get paid to cover the shows.
    Why not be a little humbling during such trying times – looks like you need it.
    Comment was not warranted. Cindy

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  2. Gee who played bass on the record?? Oh wait….I did!! No mention of bass and vocal contributions anywhere. I’m sure they didn’t mention it either….

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